Workplace Health: What Makes the Biggest Difference?

The government Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest a planned approach to building a healthier workplace, including an assessment of workplace health risks and employee concerns; a planning process for health programs; implementation; and evaluation. They suggest that the workplace health and wellness approach should embrace health-related programs, worksite policies and employee benefits, as well as environmental studies.

While physical health may be the first aspect that comes to mind in defining a healthier workplace, emotional health is also important. For emotional health, it is vital to feel appreciated, secure in one’s job and satisfied in a job well done; friendship and support from co-workers are also essential.

If you would like to express your opinion on what makes the biggest difference in workplace health and wellness, take the poll on LinkedIn at Let’s Talk Health Care or leave your comments here.

Disclosure: I’ve partnered with Harvard Pilgrim on this sponsored post. However, the thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. You can find more ways to be well at HarvardPilgrim.org/CountUsIn and Let’s Talk Health Care.

 

 

Wellness at Work: Keeping Healthy Employees Healthy and Sick Employees Away

Now that I am a sole proprietor of a business, if I fall ill at work, I don’t drag down anyone else’s health. But back when I was working for corporations, I often came to the office coughing, sneezing and needing a nap during the day to keep functioning.

I came to work because deadlines didn’t change to accommodate illness; and sick days were valuable and hoarded. I needed them, not only to care for myself, but to care for my family during bouts of chicken pox, flu and those horrible colds that circulate from one family member to the next. So instead, I contributed to the circulation of germs at work, from one employee to the next.

Sick employees mean less productivity and, yes, missed deadlines; every company has an interest in the wellness of its employees.

But what can and should companies do to stop sick employees from infecting healthy employees? Please join the discussion on LinkedIn.

Disclosure: I’ve partnered with Harvard Pilgrim on this sponsored post. However, the thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. You can find more ways to be well at HarvardPilgrim.org/CountUsIn and Let’s Talk Health Care.