A Bill of Rights for Your Reader

Sometimes I wish there were a bill of rights governing content for customers! Readers have the right to content that addresses their problem, offers a clear solution, is written logically and clearly, and explains what to do next.

You try your best. You’ve produced reams of online and paper content describing your products and services. But sheer volume isn’t enough. Here are the four biggest reasons a marketing message violates the bill of rights:

  • Nobody cares. You’re excited by your achievements. I once had a client whose entire brochure focused on her artistic philosophy and growth. But her customers weren’t interested in her personal triumphs. Their immediate concerns were, “What are you selling, what does it cost, and why should I buy it from you?”
  • It’s confusing. When you cobble content together from old content or have multiple authors writing independently, mistakes enter. For example, I often encounter both marketing and technical content where measurements shift from metric to English and back again; in this case, I recommend giving both measurements at all times: “approximately 10 feet (3 meters).” When customers receive information that’s inconsistent, outdated, or simply wrong, they begin to mistrust whatever you tell them.
  • No one understands it. Your customers expect content written in the plainest possible English, information they can understand quickly and thoroughly. One of my clients stated that “our chemical research has created an absolutely inexhaustible wealth of forms, phenomena, and possibilities.” What they meant was this: “our research has created a wealth of chemicals and new ways to use them.” If you consistently write with 4- and 5-syllable words, business jargon, acronyms, and tech speak or if you skimp on explanations because “everybody knows that,” you’re in trouble.
  • No one can find it. If you dump everything you do or provide into one huge list–or worse, one huge sentence–for the customer to sort out, the customer gives up. I remember a client who wrote a three-chapter proposal: 10 pages in the Introduction, 5 pages in the Conclusion, and 277 endless pages of actual information in the middle. Organize your content so that customers are guided directly to the information they are looking for.

When content aligns with the bill of rights, customers recognize themselves and their problems in your message. They understand that you have the solution they need and how to acquire that solution. And they don’t have to fight for the information because your writing uses everyday, straight-forward, consistent language in a format that is easy to follow.

Having trouble establishing your own bill of rights for marketing content? Contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications. Our words mean business.

Video Instructions: 5 Golden Rules

Many companies have now turned to video for showing customers how to use their product. Videos are an excellent way to connect with customers. However, they should still follow the five golden rules for good instructions.

  1. Never assume. Start your instructions from the very beginning–that might mean showing the viewer or reader how to plug in the product or where to find the start button. If you are offering a series of videos, building in complexity or detail, make sure you refer to the previous videos for viewers who are not aware they are starting in the middle.
  2. Be consistent. Always refer to buttons, menu items, the names of previous videos (or chapters), operations, processes, and so on using the same exact terms. Your viewer will quickly become confused if the same screen shot is called the “home page,” the “opening screen,” or “screen 1” in different videos or different parts of the same video.
  3. Be thorough. Before your release a video or written procedures, follow the instructions using only the steps in the video or on the page. If you find your hands doing something else, revise. You overlooked a step and you are in danger of losing your audience.
  4. Be exact. It’s easy to tell a customer “click here” or “see this” or “move this way” without ever defining here” or “this.” But your customers may have no idea what you’re referring to no matter how carefully they watch or read. In addition, customers often try to follow directions while actually working on the product. How can video viewers tell what “click here” means unless they are looking directly at the screen?
  5. Go slow. The best instructions are divided into discrete steps that viewers or readers can master at their own speed. Readers have a lot of control over speed; viewers have very little. If video instructions come at viewers too fast, they have to pause and backtrack and pause and backtrack. All that backtracking interferes with their learning and enjoyment.

You may want to provide written procedures that customers can download based on your videos. The written procedures and videos should at least complement each other even if they aren’t exact duplicates. It they contradict each other, you have a major problem.

Would you benefit from help in creating clear scripts and written procedures for your customers? Contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications today.

Website Review: 5 Common Website Problems

Successful websites are constantly evolving: new pages, new blog posts, new success stories. But that new content opens the door to errors and inconsistencies. I have reviewed many websites and always discovered at least some of these 5 problems:

  1. Links that go nowhere. Of all the content that changes on a website, active links are the most likely to go wrong. The link was entered wrong to begin with or the page being linked to no longer exists. Links should be checked often.
  2. Inconsistencies in content from page to page. Whether the inconsistency involves serial commas (comma before the “and”) appearing and disappearing or variations in product and service names and prices, pages written at different times seldom match up. When any page is added, updated or deleted, then the entire website should be reviewed for inconsistencies in content.
  3. Changes in mission. As your business progresses, you may find that the products and services your customers demand differ from the products and services  you originally wrote about. Newly important information may be buried on secondary pages or may not appear at all. You need to periodically review and rewrite your to highlight the products and services your customers want most.
  4. Errors of spelling and grammar. Your original website may have been letter-perfect but chances are several people have had their hands on it since then. In addition, you may know your website so well that you fail to see mistakes, reading what you think should be there rather than what is. Typos happen. Make sure they don’t happen on your site.
  5. Abandoned pages. You may have started your website with great intentions to write a blog post every week and a news item every month, but now the dates on the posts and news are two years old. The staff you praised on your “About Us” page no longer works for the company. The product you introduced has been replaced twice over. Those abandoned pages are better off removed than standing as a constant reminder to you and your customers about your lack of follow-through.

TWP Marketing & Technical Communications offers cost-effect reviews of websites, providing a fresh eye to seek out problems with links, inconsistent content, mission, spelling, grammar and abandoned pages. Contact us today.