4 Marketing Tips for Manufacturers

Some marketing sites will urge manufacturers to use phrases like “state of the art” and “precision engineered” in their marketing copy. Unfortunately, no one searching for manufactured products or manufacturing services ever searches on “state of the art” or “precision engineered” or any other vague term: they search for what they want, whether that’s a Phillips head screwdriver or an industrial generator.

Here are 4 marketing tips for manufacturers that actually work:

  1. Use Long Tail Keywords. These are search terms that are very precise and usually several words long (for example, “150 watt portable generator”). Long tail keywords in your marketing copy attract people who are actively looking for what you are selling–and are well on their way to becoming buyers.
  2. Keep Your Website and Social Media Active. The more reasons you create for people to click onto your site, the better. But if your website has become stagnant, without new blog posts, videos,news releases, or case studies, you have nothing to link to with your social media posts and your customers have no reason to return. According to one survey, 82% of manufacturing marketers attribute more content creation for an increase in success over last year.
  3. Write in Clear Language Focused on the Customer. Yes, your customers may be experts in their field but they aren’t experts in your field; that’s why they are coming to you for what they need. If your just-in-time, flexible manufacturing system is worth boasting about, let customers know how it helps them. Define acronyms, even if you believe everyone knows them, and do not ever invent your own jargon (“advanced processing system application scenario”).
  4. Use photos and video liberally. The Content Marketing Institute discovered in its 2018 survey that the top three successful content marketing approaches were social media, email newsletters, and video. Post videos showing your manufacturing processes, use or maintenance of your product, or your equipment working at a customer’s site, to create an instant connection to potential customers.

If you have trouble finding the time and resources to create content–whether for website, newsletter,  videos, or social media posts–you may want to hire a freelance writer with experience writing for both international and local manufacturers, including manufacturers of medical equipment, borewelders, and cables. TWP Marketing & Technical Communications is ready to help.

A New Year’s Look at Your Website

Have you taken a gander yet at the latest in website design?

The Latest Website Design

On home pages, the content is tighter, with more visual interest.

Navigation bars are simpler, so that visitors can quickly dive into the solution they need.

Instead of wading through large blocks of text, visitors click on a photo with accompanying caption to search for more information on a specific topic. Or they listen to a video.

The website is constantly refreshed with blog posts, case studies, news releases, and insight papers.

And there are opportunities on every page for visitors to click through to the contact information.

Help for Your Website

You don’t have to adopt all these changes, but you should take a close look at your website content for wordiness, static copy, and complex navigation. You want to ensure that your website has:

  • Clear, concise, compelling, and factual content that quickly attracts and holds the interest of your audience.
  • Content organized to highlight your most important products and services while helping visitors navigate through your site.
  • Photos, videos, and other interactive elements that take full advantage of the internet’s capabilities.
  • Interviews, testimonials, and exciting insights in blog posts, success stories, press releases, and insight papers to keep your website fresh.

TWP Marketing & Technical Communications

Based in Peterborough, New Hampshire, I offer the highest quality writing–with credits in Forbes, the Boston Review, Oil & Gas Journal, and other publications. I work with sole proprietors, large corporations, and anyone in between in both technical and nontechnical fields. Because I’m a freelance writer, you have the option of using me just once on a specific website project or over-and-over as the need for new content arises. Some of my clients have disappeared for years and then resurfaced with a new need–and some keep me busy every week writing blog posts, newsletters, or press releases.

Not clear what your writing needs are? I’m happy to discuss your current website and how I can help bring it to the next level. Keep ahead of the times and your competition! Contact me at write at twriteplus.com. I look forward to hearing from you.

Customer First: What That Really Means for Writing

Imagine this: You enter a brick and mortar store and the sales person comes up to you and recites, “We have books, clothing, housewares, electronics featuring a sale on cell phones, a real coffee bar featuring freshly baked coconut muffins, superior customer service, with great prices, fast delivery and…”

How quickly do you interrupt?

You know what you want and the rest of the sales person’s monologue is irrelevant. Now let’s take that concept to the written word. If you want to customers to read your writing, you should never start with a monologue on “what we do and why we’re great at it.”

Putting the Customer First

As I’ve often said, “We can solve your problem” is the most powerful promise a business can deliver to a customer. But to deliver that promise, you have to listen before you speak. Let customers tell you what their problem is–a new dress, a home renovation, a drop in sales–and then offer your solution.

Remember, there is always another web or brochure page, blog post, success story, or article that you can write. Don’t pack everything into one toss of the printer. You are better off targeting and serving a single type of customer than trying to pull in everyone at once.

Even very large online companies, like Amazon, provide a way for customers to quickly move from their website’s first page to the information they are really interested in. If Amazon can start with the customer’s problem, so can you.

How Navigation Bars (and Subtitles) Help or Hinder

On websites, one of my pet peeves is the ubiquitous “Services” or “Products” category on the navigation bar. That may be justified if you provide many different services or products. But if you have a few specialties, consider mentioning them directly on the navigation bar. (By the way, the same applies to subtitles in marketing and technical copy–lots of precise subtitles make everything more readable!)

For example, one of my clients is a sales consultant whose original navigation bar and home page focused on “Services.” But once we determined that she excelled in three main areas, we changed the navigation bar to read “Generate Leads,” “Increase Revenue,” and “Close More Sales.” We also made sure the home page text centered on those three services, with individual links to later pages. As a result, customers immediately felt that the consultant understood and offered a solution for their most pressing problems. And each customer could go directly to the page that mattered most. The faster readers get to the information they want, the more likely they are to stay and buy.

Conclusion

Ready to change a boring monologue into a helpful conversation? Contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications today.

 

When Marketing Copy Confuses Customers: What Next?

As much as business owners try to communicate clearly, sometimes customers still find marketing copy confusing.

Over the years, I’ve come to recognize four basic ways that marketing copy confuses customers:

  • Confusion over the message. One of my clients began by helping her clients work through financial issues and then found herself offering advice on straightening out their staff and customer relations. Her background and education made her a gifted consultant in all three areas; but her marketing copy stayed focused on finance, creating confusion for potential clients and referrals. We worked together to sharpen her mission and suddenly everything she offered fell into place.
  • Confusion over the audience. Another client, a website developer, never quite defined his customers’ level of expertise. Part of the time his marketing copy assumed customers recognized high-tech jargon and acronyms; part of the time his copy defined basic concepts in excruciating detail. Customers were either baffled or bored. We settled on a middle course, cutting back on the jargon, acronyms, and explanations to focus on benefits to all his customers. After all, what customers want to know most is: What do I get out of it?
  • Confusion over organization. A company started its marketing copy by listing the products it manufactured–but then the rest of the marketing copy ignored those products entirely and focused on the manufacturing process. Customers want to know where marketing copy is headed. If you say you have four products, they want to read about four products, not three products and a process. If you say regulatory compliance is important, they want to hear about compliance. Guide them carefully along or you’ll lose them in poor organization.
  • Confusion over individual words. Sometimes marketing copy uses the wrong word (for example, “intransient problem” instead of “intransigent problem”). Sometimes it piles on adjectives (“this extraordinary, unparalleled, unique opportunity”) as if more adjectives equal more information. In either case, I always advise clients to use the simplest and most precise language they can–to write like they talk when they are talking to their favorite customers.

Let’s make sure your marketing copy never confuses customers. I’ll help you define your message, audience, and organization, and then choose the right words to grab and keep their attention. Contact TWP today.

Why Can’t I Finish My Website?

Q. I’ve been writing my website content for weeks–okay, for months–and none of it makes any sense. I should know my business better than anyone, right? Why can’t I finish my website?

A. Right now, your competitors are flaunting their websites (and other marketing collateral) everywhere. If you want to compete with them, you have to finish writing. If you can’t finish your website, you are probably facing one of these problems:

  • Your content is being written or reviewed by committee–even if the committee is in your own head. Committees, whether real or imaginary, quarrel over every sentence, demanding a better, different, more creative, briefer way to say the same thing. There are thousands of ways to write good copy; thousands of ways to write this very sentence; and committees will argue until doomsday over a single comma.Stop the endless self- or committee-editing, and let your website compete in the real world.
  • You are hoping that if you gather enough information, it will magically coalesce. Unfortunately, lots of information may actually operate against a coherent website. You have to focus and prioritize. View all that information from the perspective of your customer–and decide on your most important message. You cannot appeal to a vague “everyone” or properly deliver dozens of competing messages on your website’s first page.
  • Your vision of the future or success in the past is preventing you from describing the business you have now. You know what you want in your future, you know what you offered in the past, but you’ve lost sight of what your customers want now, in their present. Websites can always be modified; in the meantime, customers want to know what you can do for them today. They won’t search for the information with fingers crossed; you must clearly tell them.

Is it time to let go of the stress of being a business owner and a writer–and let a professional writer take over? If your website (or other marketing collateral) is bogged down by self-editing, too much information gathering, or wishful thinking, contact TWP Marketing and Technical Communications. We’ll give you words that energize your marketplace and start your website working hard for you!

The Website Review You Need Now

Your website has served you well for a long time. But even if a website doesn’t change over the years, the world around it does, including your own company.

Take a deep breath. The following basic steps for a website review will help you evaluate the relevance and consistency of your existing website:

  1. Compare your website content to your corporate goals and values. Have your goals for your business changed? Have you said what you meant to say? Have you said what you need to say in the best words to capture and keep the interest of customers?
  2. Check the navigation. Are you lumping everything you do under one generic “Products” or “Services” page or does the navigation help customers find what they are really looking for? Is your navigation easy to follow and understand? Are the links working?
  3. Really look at your pictures and videos. Are they professional and representative of you and your company? Have you included pictures of actual projects you’ve completed, customers you’ve served, products you sell and staff your customers will relate to?
  4. Check the dates on your testimonials, case studies, blogs and articles. Are they reasonably current (in the last 5 years) and are they still relevant? Do they represent your proudest moments now?
  5. Compare your website to the competition’s. Has your website design kept pace with the designs your competitors are using? Is your differentiator still valid? Are you missing a vital piece of information (for example, conformance to new regulations)? Have you overlooked an opportunity to provide customers with information that other sites don’t carry?
  6. Print out the entire website (every page!) and proofread for grammar, spelling and consistency. The proofreading stage of a website review catches those inadvertent changes and typos that occur over time, especially when multiple people have access to a website’s content. The style used for numbers (0.05 or .05 or $4B or $4 billion), the presence or absence of a serial comma, the reliance on bold or italics for emphasis all need to be consistent. Those details are easy to miss when you proofread online.
  7. Evaluate the ease of use and responsiveness of your contact information: phone number(s), email(s) and forms. If you were a customer, would you feel welcomed?  Are your forms properly set up to qualify potential customers without frustrating them?

Repeat each of these efforts regularly. If you need professional help, please contact TWP Marketing & Communications for an affordable website review or an entire website makeover.

Does Your Website Educate Your Customers?

Your website has many goals, chief among them to introduce your company to new visitors and to convert those visitors to customers. A website that educates through blogs, case studies, e-newsletters, and dedicated website pages gives visitors a reason to return and to trust you enough to become customers. Here are the most important reasons for adding educational content to your website:

You have an opportunity to display your subject matter expertise. Even if every company in your field draws from the same body of knowledge, when you share that knowledge with customers, you establish yourself and your company as experts in their eyes.

Customers truly don’t know as much as you think they know. Customers are always looking for new information and for confirmation of the information they already have–whether that information is, yes, I am a size 8 or yes, hexafluoro-2-butene is used for dielectric etching.

The more questions you answer, the more likely customers will think of you first when they need answers: what product best fits their needs, whether a solution exists for their problem, and whether the advice they are getting elsewhere is correct. You want them to contact you for answers, not your competitor.

Visitors and customers appreciate a website that gathers into one convenient place the information they are searching for. A website that educates becomes a resource that visitors return to again and again. Each visit gives you another chance to convert visitors to customers and to remind customers why they value you.

Your website can anticipate and counter any hesitation by your customers. Your educational content provides accurate answers before customers become tangled in misinformation and before your help line is overwhelmed with repetitions of the same basic questions.

Creating a website that educates alerts you to the intellectual property in your own company. Your employees have knowledge that they have never shared because no one asked or because they mistakenly thought “everyone knows that.” When they become involved in creating educational content, their knowledge enriches your company as well as your customers.

A website that educates is constantly renewed. As information changes in your field, as you offer more details on a subject, or as customers and visitors ask for clarifications, you bring in new content–making search engines happy and increasing the chances that your website will be found.

It’s easy to create educational content. At TWP Marketing & Technical Communications, we have created web pages, blogs, case studies, and e-newsletters that educate visitors and consumers in industries as diverse as extruded medical tubing and home renovations. Contact us today and begin to educate your customers on just how great your company is.

Four Rules of Good Writing

We all know the rules of good conversation: keep your audience in mind, avoid one-up-manship (and nonstop bragging), try not to bore people to tears, and listen.

Another rule: good writing is good talking. Here are a few stories that explain why:

1. Know Your Audience. John Smith (none of the names here are real) ran a plumbing business and filled his website with bathroom humor. Not everyone appreciates bathroom humor; and someone in the midst of a plumbing catastrophe probably appreciates it even less. One website cannot appeal to everyone. But make sure your website appeals to the audience you want to reach most.

2. Avoid One-Up-Manship. Mary Jones wrote a website that detailed her life history as an artist, bragging about her many triumphs as an artist. However, the website never mentioned what her art cost, where it could be found, how buyers could contact her–she was too busy bragging. Long lists of what you can do, long explanations of how you achieved your greatness, and disparaging remarks about competition fail to address what every customer wants to know: What can you do for me?

3. Know When You Are Boring. Sue Johnson led a technical company which addressed a complex message to others who were knowledgeable in her technical field. She needed a website filled with details and arcane language–it suited her product and her audience. But to keep her audience interested, her marketing materials, from website to brochure, needed to move away from long blocks of text. When she improved the formatting (using tables, headlines, bullets) and introduced videos, case studies, photographs, testimonials, blogs, and Q&A pullouts, her audience stayed on the website longer and appreciated her expertise more. No matter how wrapped up someone is in technology, they still appreciate a good story and an interesting layout.

4. Listen. Bob Adams had a successful full-time career as an IT strategist. However, when he went freelance, his clients kept pushing him to solve basic hardware and network problems. He listened to his clients, began marketing to what his clients requested, and now has a successful business with a staff. His long-term clients have also learned to trust him enough to request his advice on IT strategy. By listening to your clients, you end up truly knowing them, you avoid one-up-manship, and you keep them interested.

Good writing is good talking. When you need help transferring your great ideas to writing, please talk to me.

 

Nonprofit Marketing

Here’s a true story: A nonprofit was used to finding all of their clients through face-to-face contact. No one had considered any other means. Their website was barely functional, with no mention of their nonprofit status; it directed visitors to an email address that no one was monitoring; and it lacked information about who they were and who they served. It was hardly more than a holding page and was their only marketing effort.

As a result, the community had an entirely misguided idea of the nonprofit’s purpose. In fact, the community thought it was a for-profit company. The nonprofit was even accused by other organizations of “raiding” clients!

The ABCs of nonprofit marketing are the same as the ABCs of for-profit marketing (audience-specific, balanced, and complete), as described in my previous blog post. But here are some of the most common errors that nonprofits make in marketing materials:

  • They neglect to say that they are a 501(c)3 nonprofit. Your nonprofit status is important to donors and granting organizations. Include that information somewhere on all your marketing materials and proposals.
  • They make it difficult for anyone to reach them. Reaching the organization should be the easiest process, whether it’s through a link on your website, an email address and phone number on your brochure, a return envelope in your appeal letter, or an article about places where you’ll be presenting or setting up a booth.
  • They do not consider the general public. The general public is filled with potential clients, donors, and volunteers. If all your marketing efforts are directed to known clients and known donors, you are missing a large part of your audience. You are also neglecting to build community support.

The nonprofit described above asked me to turn their marketing efforts around. I stressed that one of the most important tasks that nonprofit marketing can accomplish is to put a face on the organization, including clients, donors, and volunteers.

I rewrote and drastically broadened the website content, and made sure that contact was simple, direct, and monitored. I wrote articles about the nonprofit, welcoming new Board members, thanking donors, and featuring (anonymous) client successes. I started a Facebook page. Once the community understood how the nonprofit was helping families right in their neighborhood, the nonprofit began to receive community-based grants and word of mouth referrals. The revised marketing opened up areas of financial support, but more importantly reached clients the nonprofit had not reached before–without jeopardizing its relationship with other organizations.

If your nonprofit is stagnating; if your marketing efforts are one-note; and if you haven’t revised your marketing materials in years, now is the time to contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications.

Websites That Drive Customers Crazy

The other day I had nearly finished purchasing an item on a retail website, and I couldn’t find the Continue or Next (or even Purchase) button. The only button on the page was labeled Add More. I didn’t want to add a second item; I wanted to purchase my first item.

When I called the store for assistance, they explained that the Add More button had the exact same function as Continue or Next. I always encourage creative content, but not when it interferes with the expectations of customers who are sure to believe that “Add More” means…add more.

One way to find out if your website is driving customers crazy is to ask yourself if you would patronize a company whose website worked and sounded like yours. Another way is to ask your customers what bothers them. Yet another way is to ask your help desk staff because they must answer the same questions from irritable customers all day long. Here are four sure ways to drive customers crazy:

  • Use popups that pop up right over the item the customer is most interested in. If the dismissal button is obvious, irritation is short lived; but many video popups are impossible to exit until the entire video finishes. Customers might very well decide to leave the page and the site rather than be held captive. Constant music or sound effects also risk driving customers away.
  • Don’t check your internal and external website links. Customers are driven crazy by links that don’t work. If you haven’t checked the links on your website for a while, please check them now. Please.
  • Change your content midway through the website. On the website for one IT service company, a free offer changed scope from page to page. Inconsistencies confuse customers but also send the message that you overlook details, even important ones like what exactly you are giving away.
  • Refuse to communicate. First, hide your contact information. Then give the phone number as a word (1-800-DONTCALL) that has to be translated into numbers. And when the customer calls the number, provide only three or four extremely narrow options, with no possibility of selecting “other.” So by the time the customer reaches a live person, the customer is already livid.

When you drive your customers crazy with your website, you lose money, whether through constant calls to your help desk, lost sales, costly mistakes in content, lost repeat customers or high employee stress and turnover.

A website review by TWP Marketing & Technical Communications examines your website page by page, item by item, to make sure that the content is clear, accurate and interesting and that everything works. This cost-effective solution helps keep your relationship with customers positive from first click to last. Contact us today.