A New Year’s Look at Your Website

Have you taken a gander yet at the latest in website design?

The Latest Website Design

On home pages, the content is tighter, with more visual interest.

Navigation bars are simpler, so that visitors can quickly dive into the solution they need.

Instead of wading through large blocks of text, visitors click on a photo with accompanying caption to search for more information on a specific topic. Or they listen to a video.

The website is constantly refreshed with blog posts, case studies, news releases, and insight papers.

And there are opportunities on every page for visitors to click through to the contact information.

Help for Your Website

You don’t have to adopt all these changes, but you should take a close look at your website content for wordiness, static copy, and complex navigation. You want to ensure that your website has:

  • Clear, concise, compelling, and factual content that quickly attracts and holds the interest of your audience.
  • Content organized to highlight your most important products and services while helping visitors navigate through your site.
  • Photos, videos, and other interactive elements that take full advantage of the internet’s capabilities.
  • Interviews, testimonials, and exciting insights in blog posts, success stories, press releases, and insight papers to keep your website fresh.

TWP Marketing & Technical Communications

Based in Peterborough, New Hampshire, I offer the highest quality writing–with credits in Forbes, the Boston Review, Oil & Gas Journal, and other publications. I work with sole proprietors, large corporations, and anyone in between in both technical and nontechnical fields. Because I’m a freelance writer, you have the option of using me just once on a specific website project or over-and-over as the need for new content arises. Some of my clients have disappeared for years and then resurfaced with a new need–and some keep me busy every week writing blog posts, newsletters, or press releases.

Not clear what your writing needs are? I’m happy to discuss your current website and how I can help bring it to the next level. Keep ahead of the times and your competition! Contact me at write at twriteplus.com. I look forward to hearing from you.

How Not to Create a Website: 8 Website Content Mistakes

Congratulations! You’re about to update your website or create one for the first time. If you want all your efforts, money, and resolve to disappear fast, do this:

  1. Assign a committee to write the content. Nothing good ever gets written by committee. Committee members contradict each other; they argue over every comma; or even worse, they don’t care about commas, so that your grammar, spelling, and emphasis changes from page to page.
  2. Let your website designer write the website content. Designers are excited by design projects; most designers aren’t excited by writing. Give them a brochure, they’ll plug in the brochure. That isn’t a website. That’s paper copy masquerading as content.
  3. Decide that your website is going to pull in customers you never had before for services you never performed before. A website alone cannot transform your business. The content has to speak to your audience, acknowledge their pain, and provide solutions that you believe in.
  4. Mimic the competition. As with any marketing materials, your website content needs to differentiate you. I’ll never forget the local New Hampshire company that posted photos on its website of New York-style skyscrapers, something with which New Hampshire is woefully under-supplied. I’ll never forget them because I would never trust them. If they want my local business, they have to be honest about being local–differentiation is a selling point.
  5. Say too much. If you pack that first website page with one endless rush of words, your audience will run. At the very least, provide headlines, bullets, and graphics to break up the text. Modern website content tends to be sparse, not overwhelming, but sparse content is difficult to write. It is easy to be verbose.
  6. Refuse help. You may benefit from an objective opinion on your choice of photos. You may believe you are writing clearly when, in fact, you know the subject so well that you are leaving out critical information. You may miss spelling or grammatical or linkage errors because you expect them to be correct. You don’t need a website review committee (see item 1) but you do need at least one reviewer.
  7. Talk to your customers. I’m not advocating talking down to customers. But refusing to answer basic questions (because “everyone knows that” and “no one ever asks that”); turning your website content into a vocabulary test; or writing with lots of acronyms and jargon will all guarantee that you lose your audience. If everyone knows as much as you know, why do they need you?
  8. Keep putting it off. You need to finish writing. The nicest quality about websites is that they can be updated. Content Management Systems are easy to learn and give you the chance to tweak your website over time. But marketing material can’t work until you send it out. Send out the website.

When you need help to start that website, create the content, review it, or finish it, contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications. It’s what we do.