Freelance Writing: Why I Write

From the moment I could hold a pen, I started writing–before I could spell a word, I scribbled. At first, the lure was tactile: the smooth flow of ink on paper, the thought that someday my ideas might be enshrined forever and ever on that clean white sheet.

As time went on, another factor entered into my love of writing: communication. Here was a way I could say what I wanted to say, in the exact words and with the exact feelings that were so hard to find at a moment’s notice. Writing gave me the time and freedom to say what needed to be said. Unfortunately, it those days, my writing hero was Charles Dickens, and it took me a while to learn that clear communication required–well, clear writing: short, exact words; short sentences; crisp pacing.

Finally, I discovered that the ability to communicate clearly in writing held value for other business owners in other industries. They valued good writing for its ability to connect them with their customers; but they were inventors, builders, thinkers, managers and sellers, not writers. They needed my skill.

After 20+ years working for technical companies and technical publications, I moved to New Hampshire and became a freelance writer, branching out to help not only my old employers but companies in the retail, construction, service, financial, energy, medical and green industries.

As a freelance writer, I help businesses reach their customers and help customers find the solutions they need. My writing grows businesses, connects individuals and solves problems. What more could I want?

5 Top Reasons Why Writing Is Still Important

Reason 1: We all write. Whether we call it blogging, tweeting, emailing, or “content,” it is still writing.

Reason 2: We can say some pretty awful things if we aren’t careful. We can misspell “vision” as “version” or “manager” as “manger” or misuse “compliment” when we mean “complement” or “they’re” when we mean “their”–which results in “Our corporate version inspires our mangers and compliments they’re strengths.”

Reason 3: We can undermine our own message. As I’ve mentioned before, some words weaken messages, including “can,” “simply,” “of course,” “approximately in the range of,” and “not.” If something is worth saying, it’s worth saying with conviction.

Reason 4: Customers deserve clarity, and businesses benefit from it. When customers must work to understand what a business is saying, they quickly give up. That means customers don’t find the solutions they need, and businesses don’t get the business they need.

Writing is important. For me, good writing is a passion. Let TWP Marketing & Technical Communications show you the way to clear, strong, accurate and passionate writing.

Put Your Marketing Message in FOCUS

Whenever a website or brochure begins with a list of all the services and products the company offers, I cringe. Lists don’t tell me, the consumer, what I most need to know: can this company solve my problem? From the company’s perspective, of course, the difficulty is in figuring out which problem. And that’s where FOCUS comes into play.

FOCUS stands for friendliness, opportunity, currency, up-selling and satisfaction. Every marketing message needs FOCUS:

Friendliness: Think of times you’ve wades through someone’s list of products and services searching for the exact one that addresses your problem; or you were treated to hundreds of words about how great a company is without ever quite understanding what the company does. When you focus your message, you guide your customers quickly to the information they need–and they are grateful.

Opportunity: What do most of your customers ask for most often? What complaints do they make most frequently about your competition? Your marketing message should focus on those gaps and explain how you’ll fill them.

Currency: We all need to make an income. What product or service brings you a steady income you can live with? That one deserves top billing in your marketing message.

Up-selling: Sometimes the item customers want most is not the item that brings you the most income (or satisfaction). But it provides an opening for you to demonstrate your skill, forge a relationship and suggest other products and services.

Satisfaction: We do best what we enjoy most. When you find that sweet spot where your customer’s needs match what you like to do, then you have a viable business and a very strong marketing message.

Do you need help to FOCUS your marketing message? Contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications; clear, focused writing is what we do.

Instant Jargon: How to Create Jargon in Your Spare Time and Lose Customers Instantly

Want to create instant jargon? It’s easy. Just think of a three-digit number and then select one item from each column below. You chose 134? You created Heuristic Reciprocal Programming. Congratulations!

What does it mean? Well, that’s the beauty of instant jargon. It can mean whatever you think it means. What do customers think it means? Unfortunately, customers  don’t have a clue. 

Baffle your friends, coworkers and most of all customers. Use instant jargon today–or better yet, contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications for alternatives that communicate accurately, concisely and clearly.