A Customer Walks Into Your Company….

A customer walks into your company and is greeted by two sales people.

Sales person A says, “We offer quality custom parts, specialized design, and professional project management services that provide dependable product solutions to meet customer needs. From simple products to complex cross-functional projects involving a variety of materials, functions and teams, we deliver quality products, on-time, backed by world class customer service and support.”

Sales person B says, “How may I help you?”

Which sales person do you think the customer will relate to?

Yet, website after website, brochure after brochure, success story after success story, and newsletter after newsletter sound like they were written by sales person A. The marketing content overwhelms (or underwhelms) the customer with long lists of vague claims that could apply to any industry from space station manufacturing to organic farming. The customer, in effect, doesn’t exist.

At TWP, we answer your customer’s most important question: “How will you help me?” Our solution-driven content differentiates your company from the competition and converts inquiries into sales. For marketing and technical writing that connects with customers, contact TWP today.

 

Five Writing Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make

Whether you’re writing an email or a 50 page brochure, a blog or an entire website, a one-page instruction or a success story, here are five mistakes that can cripple your effort to connect with customers:

  • You didn’t identify your audience. Before you can write for your customers, you have to know who they are and what they want. What problem are you solving for them?
  • You didn’t focus. Even major department stores, with thousands of products, focus their brochures, website and blogs on one topic at a time. A list of everything you can do or sell isn’t marketing, it’s monologuing.
  • You forgot the power of pictures. Sometimes the best way to deliver a marketing message isn’t in words but in photos, drawings and charts. (Be sure to label any pictures so that search engines can find them.)
  • You were lured by the phrase of the moment. The strongest marketing messages are those with the most truth expressed in the simplest words. Anything can be a “proactively engineered state-of-the-art system,” even a paperclip. To differentiate your product or service, stay away from the phrase of the moment.
  • You never reviewed your marketing materials as a whole. As a result, your brochure says something different from your website and your website is out of date and neither one supports your latest success story or Tweet.

A great marketing message targets a specific audience, keeps its focus, uses as few words as possible, differentiates you from the competition and is consistent. Maintain those standards, and your customers will definitely get the message.

Need help? Contact TWP Marketing & Technical Communications today.