Finding & Telling Your Marketing Story: Part III

In my last two blog posts, I spoke about telling your marketing story by appealing to the senses, using visuals and incorporating characters. There are other techniques that great story tellers use to draw in their audience, but in this Part III post I’d like to address how to find your marketing story.

I’ve given some hints along the way but here are a few details about the best sources for writing unique marketing stories:

  • Your former customers are the first and best source for marketing stories about how you helped them. Often customers aren’t forthcoming if they are speaking directly to the business owner or the business owner assumes the answers to basic questions instead of asking or the business owner feels awkward about taking on the role of interviewer. If you have any of those problems, the solution is to ask someone else (a freelance writer like me, for example!) to handle the interviewing for you.
  • Your staff is an excellent source of marketing stories about tricky jobs they’ve successfully tackled or advice they wish they could give to customers or tips and techniques they have used. Let them share their advice and their triumphs in a newsletter or blog or in articles. They don’t need to be great writers, just good talkers.
  • Your current marketing content can provide clues to marketing stories. Do you use “state-of-the-art” techniques or equipment? Why are they state-of-the-art? Do you offer “the best customer service”? What makes it the best? Are you “an industry leader”? How did you achieve that position? Your customers don’t know; they aren’t mind readers. Every time you come across a vague statement in your marketing copy, you’ve found a story that needs detailed telling.
  • Every customer wants to know if you can solve their problem. A great marketing story exists in your approach to problem solving and the standards you apply to make sure a problem is solved to the customer’s and your own satisfaction. You are an expert in your field. If your customers were experts, they wouldn’t need you. Share some of that expertise by writing FAQs, Q&As, articles or blog posts.

When you find your story and write it, you are making a connection with customers that is more powerful than any stark list of tasks or services that you provide. Stories create a bond that no amount of facts can equal. I would be proud to help you find and write your story.

TWP Marketing & Technical Communications has helped business owners find and tell their marketing stories in the technical, healthcare, manufacturing, retail, construction and service industries.