Your Writing Questions about Content, Tag Lines, Writer’s Block

Today I’m sharing a few writing questions that have come across my desk in the last 6 months.

Q. I have a limited budget for marketing. Should I spend it on website content, a blog, articles in print or online, case studies–where is it best to start?

A. If you don’t have a website, then building one–even three pages–is your first priority. Articles are generally free. If you have news (for example, the fact that you now have a website), most newspapers and online news organs are happy to publish it for free. After that, your priorities for writing content depend on the answers to three questions: who are your customers; where are you in most contact with them (for example, online, in person, in print); and what resources (time and people as well as budget) do you have to dedicate to reaching them? Every business is different.

Q. How important is a tag line?

A. A good tag line gives customers a snapshot of your company. My own tag line is “Our words mean business.” Combined with the name of my company (TWP Marketing & Technical Communications), it tells customers everything they need to know. When you are developing a tag line, consider if it will add information to your company name; whether it will distinguish you from your competition; and whether it is easy to include on everything from business cards to the sides of a truck, if need be. Once you have a tag line, stick with it. You don’t gain more recognition with a half dozen tag lines. You simply confuse customers.

Q. How do I begin writing when I don’t know what to write?

A. Among the services I provide clients are two that help with this dilemma.

The first is the interview, where we discuss your company’s goals, your customers, your personal style, your resources (time, people, budget) and other relevant information, such as geography and competition.

The second is the first draft–I tell clients that I am thrilled if they like the first draft but they should be willing to tear it apart. Often it is easier to know what you want after you see what you don’t want. If that first draft delivers on the “don’t want,” I am prepared to make a 160 degree change and give you a second draft that is everything you do want.

If you need a little DIY encouragement, I always suggest talking to a chair. Pretend your ideal customer is sitting in that chair and explain to your customer why he or she should buy your product, service or solution. What problem will you solve or what pain will you alleviate? That explanation is the content you want to write.